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    The Divine Comedy
    work by Dante
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    The Divine Comedy

    work by Dante
    Alternative Titles: “Commedia”, “La divina commedia”

    The Divine Comedy, Italian La divina commedia, original name La commedia, long narrative poem written in Italian circa 1308–21 by Dante. It is usually held to be one of the world’s great works of literature. Divided into three major sections—Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso—the narrative traces the journey of Dante from darkness and error to the revelation of the divine light, culminating in the Beatific Vision of God.

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    Dante is guided by the Roman poet Virgil, who represents the epitome of human knowledge, from the dark wood through the descending circles of the pit of Hell (Inferno). Passing Lucifer at the pit’s bottom, at the dead centre of the world, Dante and Virgil emerge on the beach of the island mountain of Purgatory. At the summit of Purgatory, where repentant sinners are purged of their sins, Virgil departs, having led Dante as far as human knowledge is able, to the threshold of Paradise. There Dante is met by Beatrice, embodying the knowledge of divine mysteries bestowed by Grace, who leads him through the successive ascending levels of heaven to the Empyrean, where he is allowed to glimpse, for a moment, the glory of God.

    For a discussion of The Divine Comedy in the context of Dante’s life and work, see Dante: The Divine Comedy. For its place in Italian literature, see Italian literature: Dante (1265–1321).

    The standard critical Italian edition of the poem, La commedia secondo l’antica vulgata (1966–67; rev. ed. 1994), was edited by Giorgio Petrocchi. Henry Boyd produced one of the early English-language translations of The Divine Comedy; it was published in 1802. Notable translations of the 20th and early 21st centuries include those by John D. Sinclair (1939–48), Dorothy L. Sayers and Barbara Reynolds (1949–62), Charles S. Singleton (1970–75), John Ciardi (1977), Allen Mandelbaum (1980–84), Robert M. Durling and Ronald L. Martinez (1996–2011), Robert and Jean Hollander (2000–07), and Robin Kirkpatrick (2006–07). Among translations of the poem’s individual sections, those by Robert Pinsky (Inferno, 1994), W.S. Merwin (Purgatorio, 2000), and Mary Jo Bang (Inferno, 2012) are notable.

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    This article was most recently revised and updated by J.E. Luebering, Executive Editorial Director.
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